Publication detail

INTELLIGENCE ANALYSIS - THE ROYAL DISCIPLINE OF COMPETITIVE INTELLIGENCE

BARTES, F.

Original Title

INTELLIGENCE ANALYSIS - THE ROYAL DISCIPLINE OF COMPETITIVE INTELLIGENCE

English Title

INTELLIGENCE ANALYSIS - THE ROYAL DISCIPLINE OF COMPETITIVE INTELLIGENCE

Type

journal article - other

Language

en

Original Abstract

In the introduction to his article, the author characterizes current practice in performing the so-called intelligence analysis within the Competitive Intelligence cycle The author advocates the establishment of Competitive Intelligence as an independent discipline, and supports the claim by the four criteria set forth by Professor Vlček. He then offers his own concept of Competitive Intelligence based on operating principles of national intelligence agencies. However, he limits his concept to the use of only legal information sources and ethical methods of work. The author proposes his own definition of the term Competitive Intelligence, which he perceives as a systemic application discipline. This concept of Competitive Analysis gives the author an opportunity to use all the possibilities and advantages that systemic application discipline offers to its user. One of the results of approaching Competitive Intelligence as a systemic application discipline is the advantage of using a Competitive Intelligence Work Plan. The author proposes the so-called "Competitive Intelligence Work Plan" consists of 13 phases. He classifies the phases into five basic work plan parts that coincide with individual five steps of the Competitive Intelligence Cycle. Step I: Direction Step II: Collecting information and research Step III: Processing and storing of information Step IV: Intelligence analysis Step V: Dissemination of intelligence The author then describes in detail the content of Competitive Intelligence work plan phases, and subdivides each of the phases into steps. He emphasizes that the Competitive Intelligence work plan is by no means a set of instructions for a mechanical execution of assigned tasks but a guideline that requires a creative approach when executing applications on each task dealt with. This creative approach does not mean, e.g., the use of a specific method of creative work, but profound knowledge in the discipline of such methods. Some of them can then be applied in certain phases of team work. The execution of each phase is obligatory, and a written report must be made of it. By contrast, some steps in individual phases may be omitted. In these cases, it is necessary to explain the reasons for their omission in writing. In his paper, the author also comments the attitude of the company's top management to the Competitive Intelligence team's final report. Conclusions of that report very often meet with little enthusiasm by the company's management. The company's management most frequent reasons for finding final report's results unsatisfactory are given. In conclusion, the author expresses his belief that the target level of the company's Competitive Intelligence activities should be the implementation of the of the "attainment of intelligence advantage over competing businesses" principle.

English abstract

In the introduction to his article, the author characterizes current practice in performing the so-called intelligence analysis within the Competitive Intelligence cycle The author advocates the establishment of Competitive Intelligence as an independent discipline, and supports the claim by the four criteria set forth by Professor Vlček. He then offers his own concept of Competitive Intelligence based on operating principles of national intelligence agencies. However, he limits his concept to the use of only legal information sources and ethical methods of work. The author proposes his own definition of the term Competitive Intelligence, which he perceives as a systemic application discipline. This concept of Competitive Analysis gives the author an opportunity to use all the possibilities and advantages that systemic application discipline offers to its user. One of the results of approaching Competitive Intelligence as a systemic application discipline is the advantage of using a Competitive Intelligence Work Plan. The author proposes the so-called "Competitive Intelligence Work Plan" consists of 13 phases. He classifies the phases into five basic work plan parts that coincide with individual five steps of the Competitive Intelligence Cycle. Step I: Direction Step II: Collecting information and research Step III: Processing and storing of information Step IV: Intelligence analysis Step V: Dissemination of intelligence The author then describes in detail the content of Competitive Intelligence work plan phases, and subdivides each of the phases into steps. He emphasizes that the Competitive Intelligence work plan is by no means a set of instructions for a mechanical execution of assigned tasks but a guideline that requires a creative approach when executing applications on each task dealt with. This creative approach does not mean, e.g., the use of a specific method of creative work, but profound knowledge in the discipline of such methods. Some of them can then be applied in certain phases of team work. The execution of each phase is obligatory, and a written report must be made of it. By contrast, some steps in individual phases may be omitted. In these cases, it is necessary to explain the reasons for their omission in writing. In his paper, the author also comments the attitude of the company's top management to the Competitive Intelligence team's final report. Conclusions of that report very often meet with little enthusiasm by the company's management. The company's management most frequent reasons for finding final report's results unsatisfactory are given. In conclusion, the author expresses his belief that the target level of the company's Competitive Intelligence activities should be the implementation of the of the "attainment of intelligence advantage over competing businesses" principle.

Keywords

Competitive Intelligence, work plan, intelligence analysis, team work, systemic application discipline, added value.

RIV year

2011

Released

31.12.2011

Publisher

Mendelova zemědělská a lesnická univerzita v Brně

Location

Brno

ISBN

1211-8516

Periodical

Acta Universitatis Agriculturae et Silviculturae Mendelianae Brunensis

Year of study

LIX

Number

7

State

CZ

Pages from

39

Pages to

56

Pages count

18

Documents

BibTex


@article{BUT76023,
  author="František {Bartes}",
  title="INTELLIGENCE ANALYSIS - THE ROYAL DISCIPLINE OF COMPETITIVE INTELLIGENCE",
  annote="In the introduction to his article, the author characterizes current practice in performing the so-called intelligence analysis within the Competitive Intelligence cycle The author advocates the establishment of Competitive Intelligence as an independent discipline, and supports the claim by the four criteria set forth by Professor Vlček. He then offers his own concept of Competitive Intelligence based on operating principles of national intelligence agencies. However, he limits his concept to the use of only legal information sources and ethical methods of work. The author proposes his own definition of the term Competitive Intelligence, which he perceives as a systemic application discipline. This concept of Competitive Analysis gives the author an opportunity to use all the possibilities and advantages that systemic application discipline offers to its user. One of the results of approaching Competitive Intelligence as a systemic application discipline is the advantage of using a Competitive Intelligence Work Plan. The author proposes the so-called "Competitive Intelligence Work Plan" consists of 13 phases. He classifies the phases into five basic work plan parts that coincide with individual five steps of the Competitive Intelligence Cycle.
Step I: Direction
Step II: Collecting information and research 
Step III: Processing and storing of information 
Step IV: Intelligence analysis
Step V: Dissemination of intelligence 
The author then describes in detail the content of Competitive Intelligence work plan phases, and subdivides each of the phases into steps. He emphasizes that the Competitive Intelligence work plan is by no means a set of instructions for a mechanical execution of assigned tasks but a guideline that requires a creative approach when executing applications on each task dealt with. This creative approach does not mean, e.g., the use of a specific method of creative work, but profound knowledge in the discipline of such methods. Some of them can then be applied in certain phases of team work. The execution of each phase is obligatory, and a written report must be made of it. By contrast, some steps in individual phases may be omitted. In these cases, it is necessary to explain the reasons for their omission in writing.
In his paper, the author also comments the attitude of the company's top management to the Competitive Intelligence team's final report. Conclusions of that report very often meet with little enthusiasm by the company's management. The company's management most frequent reasons for finding final report's results unsatisfactory are given. In conclusion, the author expresses his belief that the target level of the company's Competitive Intelligence activities should be the implementation of the of the "attainment of intelligence advantage over competing businesses" principle.",
  address="Mendelova zemědělská a lesnická univerzita v Brně",
  chapter="76023",
  institution="Mendelova zemědělská a lesnická univerzita v Brně",
  number="7",
  volume="LIX",
  year="2011",
  month="december",
  pages="39--56",
  publisher="Mendelova zemědělská a lesnická univerzita v Brně",
  type="journal article - other"
}