Publication detail

A bioresorbable biomaterial carrier and passive stabilization device to improve heart function post-myocardial infarction

Eimear B. Dolan, Björn Hofmann, M. Hamman de Vaal, Gabriella Bellavia, Stefania Straino, Lenka Kovarova, Martin Pravda, Vladimir Velebny, Dorothee Daro, Nathalie Braun, David S. Monahan, Ruth E. Levey, Hugh O'Neill, Svenja Hinderer, Robert Greensmith, Michael G. Monaghan, Katja Schenke-Layland, Peter Dockery, Bruce P. Murphy, Helena M. Kelly, Stephen Wildhirt, Garry P. Duffy

Original Title

A bioresorbable biomaterial carrier and passive stabilization device to improve heart function post-myocardial infarction

English Title

A bioresorbable biomaterial carrier and passive stabilization device to improve heart function post-myocardial infarction

Type

journal article in Web of Science

Language

en

Original Abstract

The limited regenerative capacity of the heart after a myocardial infarct results in remodeling processes that can progress to congestive heart failure (CHF). Several strategies including mechanical stabilization of the weakened myocardium and regenerative approaches (specifically stem cell technologies) have evolved which aim to prevent CHF. However, their final performance remains limited motivating the need for an advanced strategy with enhanced efficacy and reduced deleterious effects. An epicardial carrier device enabling a targeted application of a biomaterial-based therapy to the infarcted ventricle wall could potentially overcome the therapy and application related issues. Such a device could play a synergistic role in heart regeneration, including the provision of mechanical support to the remodeling heart wall, as well as providing a suitable environment for in situ stem cell delivery potentially promoting heart regeneration. In this study, we have developed a novel, single-stage concept to support the weakened myocardial region post-MI by applying an elastic, biodegradable patch (SPREADS) via a minimal-invasive, closed chest intervention to the epicardial heart surface. We show a significant increase in %LVEF 14 days post-treatment when GS (clinical gold standard treatment) was compared to GS + SPREADS + Gel with and without cells (p <= 0.001). Furthermore, we did not find a significant difference in infarct quality or blood vessel density between any of the groups which suggests that neither infarct quality nor vascularization is the mechanism of action of SPREADS. The SPREADS device could potentially be used to deliver a range of new or previously developed biomaterial hydrogels, a remarkable potential to overcome the translational hurdles associated with hydrogel delivery to the heart.

English abstract

The limited regenerative capacity of the heart after a myocardial infarct results in remodeling processes that can progress to congestive heart failure (CHF). Several strategies including mechanical stabilization of the weakened myocardium and regenerative approaches (specifically stem cell technologies) have evolved which aim to prevent CHF. However, their final performance remains limited motivating the need for an advanced strategy with enhanced efficacy and reduced deleterious effects. An epicardial carrier device enabling a targeted application of a biomaterial-based therapy to the infarcted ventricle wall could potentially overcome the therapy and application related issues. Such a device could play a synergistic role in heart regeneration, including the provision of mechanical support to the remodeling heart wall, as well as providing a suitable environment for in situ stem cell delivery potentially promoting heart regeneration. In this study, we have developed a novel, single-stage concept to support the weakened myocardial region post-MI by applying an elastic, biodegradable patch (SPREADS) via a minimal-invasive, closed chest intervention to the epicardial heart surface. We show a significant increase in %LVEF 14 days post-treatment when GS (clinical gold standard treatment) was compared to GS + SPREADS + Gel with and without cells (p <= 0.001). Furthermore, we did not find a significant difference in infarct quality or blood vessel density between any of the groups which suggests that neither infarct quality nor vascularization is the mechanism of action of SPREADS. The SPREADS device could potentially be used to deliver a range of new or previously developed biomaterial hydrogels, a remarkable potential to overcome the translational hurdles associated with hydrogel delivery to the heart.

Keywords

Ventricular stabilization; Epicardial carrier device; Extravascular device; Hyaluronic acid hydrogel; Stem cell delivery; Myocardial infarction

Released

01.10.2019

Publisher

ELSEVIER

Location

AMSTERDAM

ISBN

0928-4931

Periodical

Materials Science and Engineering C-Materials for Biological Applications

Year of study

103

Number

109751

State

NL

Pages from

1

Pages to

17

Pages count

17

URL

Documents

BibTex


@article{BUT163638,
  author="Eimear B. {Dolan} and Lenka {Kovářová}",
  title="A bioresorbable biomaterial carrier and passive stabilization device to improve heart function post-myocardial infarction",
  annote="The limited regenerative capacity of the heart after a myocardial infarct results in remodeling processes that can progress to congestive heart failure (CHF). Several strategies including mechanical stabilization of the weakened myocardium and regenerative approaches (specifically stem cell technologies) have evolved which aim to prevent CHF. However, their final performance remains limited motivating the need for an advanced strategy with enhanced efficacy and reduced deleterious effects. An epicardial carrier device enabling a targeted application of a biomaterial-based therapy to the infarcted ventricle wall could potentially overcome the therapy and application related issues. Such a device could play a synergistic role in heart regeneration, including the provision of mechanical support to the remodeling heart wall, as well as providing a suitable environment for in situ stem cell delivery potentially promoting heart regeneration. In this study, we have developed a novel, single-stage concept to support the weakened myocardial region post-MI by applying an elastic, biodegradable patch (SPREADS) via a minimal-invasive, closed chest intervention to the epicardial heart surface. We show a significant increase in %LVEF 14 days post-treatment when GS (clinical gold standard treatment) was compared to GS + SPREADS + Gel with and without cells (p <= 0.001). Furthermore, we did not find a significant difference in infarct quality or blood vessel density between any of the groups which suggests that neither infarct quality nor vascularization is the mechanism of action of SPREADS. The SPREADS device could potentially be used to deliver a range of new or previously developed biomaterial hydrogels, a remarkable potential to overcome the translational hurdles associated with hydrogel delivery to the heart.",
  address="ELSEVIER",
  chapter="163638",
  doi="10.1016/j.msec.2019.109751",
  howpublished="online",
  institution="ELSEVIER",
  number="109751",
  volume="103",
  year="2019",
  month="october",
  pages="1--17",
  publisher="ELSEVIER",
  type="journal article in Web of Science"
}